Flying with Baby – The Essential Guide to Flying Domestically with Infants Under 1 Year Old

Flying with Baby – The Essential Guide to Flying Domestically with Infants Under 1 Year Old
Updated on : February 8, 2013
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Flying with Child – The Crucial Guide to Flying Domestically with Infants Beneath 1 Year Old

Flying with Child – The Crucial Guide to Flying Domestically with Infants Below 1 Year Old

Are you dreading your baby’s initial flight?

“Can I bring breastmilk through safety? And what about her ears popping during takeoff… and is my vehicle seat certified to bring aboard?”

Blogger Meg Collins (CPST) of LuciesList.com addresses all of the commonly asked queries and concerns about flying with your baby. With input from veteran flyers and flight attendants, you’ll discover exactly how to get from A to B as easily as feasible.

Topics include:

- Purchasing tickets
- Where to sit
- How to score a cost-free seat
- Dealing with you auto seat & stroller
- Getting by way of safety
- Breastfeeding & pumping
- Keeping your infant pleased
- Feeding & a lot more

“I was so nervous about our 1st flight with baby Darren, but your book put me at ease and ready me for every thing I needed to know. Thanks!!” — Janice McCullough

“This book is funny and informative, in classic Lucie’s List style. We had NO troubles on our initial flight. Thank you!!” — Kara Quinn

Auto accidents are the #1 trigger of death for young children below 14 years old. Though it is impossible to completely get rid of the chance of death or serious injury, there are steps you can take to significantly reduce the possibilities of something happening. The American Academy of Pediatrics now recommends that every single kid be in a rear-facing car seat even though riding in a vehicle till at least the age of 2. Knowledge is energy, and nothing is worth my child’s life.
Video Rating: four / five

Check Out These Great Parenting Tips Today!

Parenting is one of life’s hardest challenges. The tips below can help you sharpen your skills as a parent and make you feel more prepared to handle the unexpected. You can become the good parent that you know you can be!

Teaching them good hygiene is important, especially after going to the bathroom or before they sit down to eat. This will contribute greatly to good health.

Getting angry doesn’t help most parents become better disciplinarians. Parents must model the self-control they want their children to exhibit by reacting calmly to negative behaviors. Getting angry often, can reduce a child’s self-esteem and send them the message that losing control is acceptable. Yelling and getting angry over minor mistakes is also harmful.

Transitions are hard on preschoolers. Switching abruptly from one task to another can often be very stressful and result in melt-downs.

Never give any child under three years of age any type of soda to drink. Instead, choose beverages that provide nutrients, like milk, juice without added sugar, and water.

As a parent, understand that not every child wants to be surrounded by people. Some kids tend to be a little shy, but that is alright. You do want to pay attention if you notice signs that your child is excessively introverted, however. If you feel that your child is too subdued and shy, it might be best to visit the doctor and discover if there are underlying issues that are causing this.

Make sure your child sees you eat a variety of fruits, vegetables and whole grains as part of your healthy diet. Doing this will show your child what proper nutrition is, and since they mimic you in every way, they will choose healthier snacks on their own.

When children misbehave, the best tool to use is positive reinforcement. Realizing that children have feelings about issues and acknowledging their feelings can help them, because they often don’t know how to verbalize their feelings. Helping your child find ways to express how they feel is one of the best things that you can do.

Having the right advice and support is the best way to develop good parenting skills. Using the valuable advice in the article above, you can be the kind of skilled, confident parent you want to be. Although it’s a large challenge, it’s vital. With the right support system and a sense of humor, you can be the parent that you want to be.

"This Best Selling Flying with Baby – The Essential Guide to Flying Domestically with Infants Under 1 Year Old Tends to SELL OUT VERY FAST! If this is a MUST HAVE product, be sure to Order Now at Amazon.com!"



What customers say about Flying with Baby – The Essential Guide to Flying Domestically with Infants Under 1 Year Old

  1. rbtzn "rbtzn" says:
    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Must read before traveling with infant!, November 19, 2012
    By 
    rbtzn “rbtzn” (Chutz L’aretz, Galus) –

    This review is from: Flying with Baby – The Essential Guide to Flying Domestically with Infants Under 1 Year Old (Kindle Edition)

    As a soon to be first-time mom who has a family reunion coming up less than 2 months after the baby is due to arrive, this book did wonders to calm my nerves about flying with an infant!! It contains valuable tips and tricks for traveling with infants, and the author presents it all with a great sense of humor and accounts of her personal experience!

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  2. Anonymous says:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Perfect!, February 5, 2013
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Flying with Baby – The Essential Guide to Flying Domestically with Infants Under 1 Year Old (Kindle Edition)

    I loved this book! Full of practical advice for a first time mom. Meg has a witty writing style that makes for an easy and entertaining read.

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  3. Anonymous says:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Meg Collins rocks!, February 4, 2013
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Flying with Baby – The Essential Guide to Flying Domestically with Infants Under 1 Year Old (Kindle Edition)

    I’m about to take off (literally) with a 3 month old to Mexico. I found this guide incredibly helpful in easing my nerves and chock full of tips and tricks to survive flying with an infant. Great, quick, easy to read, full of Meg’s signature wit and quips that I have grown to love through ‘Lucie’s List’ the only downside is that it doesn’t contain any ‘International’ travel info (as I’m flying from Canada to Mexico) – all of the general information however, was super useful and relevant!

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  4. Mary Scott says:

    it will help those moms I previously mentioned. It’s scary to think that this isn’t common knowledge!

  5. Mary Scott says:

    I just posted this video on a friend’s Facebook page because she and her friends were discussing when to transition their babies to the next sized carseat and the subject of rear facing came up. A few people made the comment that they couldn’t see doing that becaues their child’s legs would get squished. I felt so nervous for their childrens’s safety I immediately posted this video and typed some of the facts you state. Thank you for this video, Jess. It was an eye opener for me and I hope

  6. cookies162 says:

    What if the road is icy or wet and you loose control of your car? What if someone walks out onto the road and you have to stop suddenly, so your child jerks forward? What if there’s a drunk driver on the road and they crash into you? What if another diver is carless and not paying attention? What if another driver falls asleep at the wheel and crashes into you? What if a million other scenarios happen that can’t be avoided no matter how much you are concentrating on the road

  7. RedPoppy411 says:

    I have a question. I am researching extenuated rear facing for my child and I want to know what happens if you are rear ended? Does it have to same affect if a child is forward facing during a frontal crash? I can’t find any info on this, can someone help?

  8. Jay Ham says:

    booster until 120? I am not even that yet, and I am 20 years old. Lol

  9. RedPoppy411 says:

    Maybe just concentrate one the road instead of what seat your child is sitting in?

  10. Alissa Meagher says:

    Diono Radian is 3 in 1; Rear-faces until 45lbs, Forward-faces in a 5 point harness to 80lbs, and Booster until 120lbs.

  11. Alissa Meagher says:

    Good job mama :)

  12. Alissa Meagher says:

    Very glad that you found out this information now before you switched him! I know a family whose 5 year old daughter is rearfacing, it’s incredible and her legs dont hurt rearfacing but she complains about them when forward facing. Many seats not (cheap ones) go up to atleast 30 lbs. My personal favorite is the Diono radian it rearfaces until 45 lbs and has kept the Eades family’s children (1,3, and almost 5) as safe as they possibly can be.

  13. 111bugger111off says:

    I can’t find any rear facing car seats that go above 13 kgs in the UK :-( My daughter will be 2 later this month and is still rearfacing…I’d like to keep her rearfacing for at least another year but she’s nearly at 13 kgs :-(

  14. tan81112 says:

    I’m in Australia (Melbourne) and I never understood why everyone changed the babies over after 6 months,made no sense to me,I have kids ranging 15 yrs to 4 months and we kept them rear facing at least over a yr old and with our 4 month old we got a better seat that will keep him rear facing alot longer

  15. Maci Wenzl says:

    Thank you so much for posting this! i thought my eight month old had to be front facing because he was over 20 pounds!

  16. whitney kawahara says:

    Thanks for the info!!!! Great to know for when we need to look for our next car seat :)

  17. 25Bsingle says:

    Try A safety 1st complete air or Diono Radain



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